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Routing

Analog supports filesystem-based routing on top of the Angular Router.

Defining Routes

Routes are defined using folders and files in the src/app/pages folder. Only files ending with .page.ts are collected and used to build the set of routes.

info

Route components must be defined as the default export and all route components are lazy-loaded.

There are 5 primary types of routes:

These routes can be combined in different ways to build URLs for navigation.

note

In addition to the 5 primary types of routes, Analog also supports Redirect Routes and Content Routes.

Index Routes

Index routes are defined by using the filename as the route path enclosed in parenthesis.

The example route below in src/app/pages/(home).page.ts defines an / route.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
standalone: true,
template: ` <h2>Welcome</h2> `,
})
export default class HomePageComponent {}
tip

Index routes can also be defined by using index.page.ts as the route filename.

Static Routes

Static routes are defined by using the filename as the route path.

The example route below in src/app/pages/about.page.ts defines an /about route.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
standalone: true,
template: `
<h2>Hello Analog</h2>

Analog is a meta-framework on top of Angular.
`,
})
export default class AboutPageComponent {}

It's also possible to define nested static routes in two different ways:

  1. By nesting the route files in folders - src/app/pages/about/team.page.ts defines an /about/team route.
  2. By using the dot notation in the filename - src/app/pages/about.team.page.ts also defines an /about/team route.

Route Groups

Routes can be grouped together in the same folder without adding a route path segment by wrapping a folder name in parenthesis.

src/
└── app/
└── pages/
└── (auth)/
├── login.page.ts
└── signup.page.ts

The above example defines /login and /signup routes.

Dynamic Routes

Dynamic routes are defined by using the filename as the route path enclosed in square brackets. The parameter for the route is extracted from the route path.

The example route below in src/app/pages/products/[productId].page.ts defines a /products/:productId route.

import { Component, inject } from '@angular/core';
import { AsyncPipe } from '@angular/common';
import { ActivatedRoute } from '@angular/router';
import { map } from 'rxjs';

@Component({
standalone: true,
imports: [AsyncPipe],
template: `
<h2>Product Details</h2>

ID: {{ productId$ | async }}
`,
})
export default class ProductDetailsPageComponent {
private readonly route = inject(ActivatedRoute);

readonly productId$ = this.route.paramMap.pipe(
map((params) => params.get('productId'))
);
}

Dynamic routes can also be defined using the dot notation in the filename - src/app/pages/products.[productId].page.ts defines a /products/:productId route.

Using Route Component Input Bindings

If you are using the withComponentInputBinding() feature with the Angular Router, you can use the Input decorator, along with the same parameter name to get the route parameter.

First, add the withComponentInputBinding() to the arguments for the provideFileRouter() function.

// src/app/app.config.ts
import { ApplicationConfig } from '@angular/core';
import { provideFileRouter } from '@analogjs/router';
import { withComponentInputBinding } from '@angular/router';

export const appConfig: ApplicationConfig = {
providers: [
provideFileRouter(withComponentInputBinding()),
// other providers
],
};

Next, use the route parameter as an input.

// src/app/pages/products/[productId].page.ts
import { Component, Input } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
standalone: true,
template: `
<h2>Product Details</h2>

ID: {{ productId }}
`,
})
export default class ProductDetailsPageComponent {
@Input() productId: string;
}

Layout Routes

Layout routes are defined by using a parent file and child folder with the same name.

The following structure below represents a layout route.

src/
└── app/
└── pages/
├── products/
│ ├── [productId].page.ts
│ └── (products-list).page.ts
└── products.page.ts

This defines two routes with a shared layout:

  • /products
  • /products/:productId

The parent src/app/pages/products.page.ts file contains the parent page with a router outlet.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { RouterOutlet } from '@angular/router';

@Component({
standalone: true,
imports: [RouterOutlet],
template: `
<h2>Products</h2>

<router-outlet></router-outlet>
`,
})
export default class ProductsComponent {}

The nested src/app/pages/products/(products-list).page.ts file contains the /products list page.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { RouterOutlet } from '@angular/router';

@Component({
standalone: true,
imports: [RouterOutlet],
template: ` <h2>Products List</h2> `,
})
export default class ProductsListComponent {}

The nested src/app/pages/products/[productId].page.ts file contains the /products/:productId details page.

import { Component, inject } from '@angular/core';
import { AsyncPipe, JsonPipe } from '@angular/common';
import { ActivatedRoute } from '@angular/router';
import { map } from 'rxjs';

@Component({
standalone: true,
imports: [AsyncPipe, JsonPipe],
template: `
<h2>Product Details</h2>

ID: {{ productId$ | async }}
`,
})
export default class ProductDetailsPageComponent {
private readonly route = inject(ActivatedRoute);

readonly productId$ = this.route.paramMap.pipe(
map((params) => params.get('productId'))
);
}

Pathless Layout Routes

Layout routes can also be defined without adding a route path segment.

src/
└── app/
└── pages/
├── (auth)/
│ ├── login.page.ts
│ └── signup.page.ts
└── (auth).page.ts

The above example defines /login and /signup routes with a shared layout. The parent src/app/pages/(auth).page.ts file contains the parent page with a router outlet.

Catch-all Routes

Catch-all routes are defined by using the filename as the route path prefixed with 3 periods enclosed in square brackets.

The example route below in src/app/pages/[...page-not-found].page.ts defines a wildcard ** route. This route is usually for 404 pages.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { RouterLink } from '@angular/router';

@Component({
standalone: true,
imports: [RouterLink],
template: `
<h2>Page Not Found</h2>

<a routerLink="/">Go Back Home</a>
`,
})
export default class PageNotFoundComponent {}

Catch-all routes can also be defined as nested child routes.

Putting It All Together

For the following file structure:

src/
└── app/
└── pages/
├── (auth)/
│ ├── login.page.ts
│ └── signup.page.ts
├── (marketing)/
│ ├── about.md
│ └── contact.md
├── products/
│ ├── (product-list).page.ts
│ ├── [productId].edit.page.ts
│ └── [productId].page.ts
├── (auth).page.ts
├── (home).page.ts
├── [...not-found].md
└── products.page.ts

The filesystem-based router will generate the following routes:

PathPage
/(home).page.ts
/about(marketing)/about.md
/contact(marketing)/contact.md
/login(auth)/login.page.ts (layout: (auth).page.ts)
/signup(auth)/signup.page.ts (layout: (auth).page.ts)
/productsproducts/(product-list).page.ts (layout: products.page.ts)
/products/1products/[productId].page.ts (layout: products.page.ts)
/products/1/editproducts/[productId].edit.page.ts (layout: products.page.ts)
/unknown-url[...not-found].md